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Singapore Historic Maps

AN EXTENSION OF

The Syntax of Space in Singapore (Sept, 2021 - WIP)

 

This is a series of historical maps produced during my investigations on the spatial logic of Singapore. Its historic developments from an ethnically segregated colonial state into the multiracial city it is today can be traced through detailed analysis of these movement networks.

 

Published on this site are the normalized integration and choice measures on a global scale. Focused on Downtown Singapore where high quality historical base maps were more readily available. 

1974 NAIN n
1974 NAIN n

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1974 NACH n
1974 NACH n

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1822 NAIN n
1822 NAIN n

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1974 NAIN n
1974 NAIN n

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NORMalized segment maps

1974 Map
1974 Map

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1969 Map
1969 Map

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1822 Map
1822 Map

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1974 Map
1974 Map

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Base historical maps

Methodology:

Historical maps from the national archive have been digitized into analyzed segment maps through the measures of normalized choice and integration. The digitization process begins with geolocating and scaling historic maps to more accurate present day coordinates through roads and referenced landmarks. The current day network model of Singapore is then modified through the subtraction and addition of streets to depict the networks from these historical maps. Maps are then selected to be analyzed based on their historic significance and the integrity of data collected. This is determined by levels of completion and level of detail recorded. Quality maps which are incomplete may also be combined with another map from a similar timeframe. This will be assessed at radius 400, 2000 and n, at a local, regional, and global movement scale. Local and regional scales will be prioritized when assessing pedestrian accessibility pre-1990s. This is because they are representative of the levels of pedestrian mobility before islandwide public transport was readily accessible (NLB, 2021).  Movement structures at these scales reveal significant patterns of Singapore’s social reproduction from daily life, education and work for people living within and traveling out of those spatial clusters.